2019-2020 Academic Year Colloquium Schedule

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September 12, 2019

Title: A Travelogue of the Mathematical Universe
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI
Abstract: Mathematics is all around us, yet can be very abstract. The goal of mathematical art is to create artistic examples of mathematical concepts that can inspire and inform us, or to use mathematical concepts to artistically tell a story. In this talk we will discuss a variety of mathematical concepts and view related mathematical artworks. Hopefully you will leave knowing a little more mathematics, and inspired to further explore the mathematical universe and create your own mathematical art travelogue!
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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September 19, 2019

Title: Planning for Graduate Study in Mathematics and Computer Science
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for graduate school in areas such as mathematics, statistics, computer science, engineering, finance, and law. Come learn about graduate school and options you will have to further your education after graduation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30
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September 26, 2019

Title: Craps and Beyond: Casino Dice Games
Speaker:Mark Bollman
Professor and Chair, Mathematics & Computer Science
Mathematics & Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI
Abstract: Dice of varying types have been found among the artifacts of many ancient civilizations, and games of chance played with dice have a history dating back many years. We will begin the craps, the most popular casino dice game, and then move on to consider game variations and other games played with dice from the mathematician's and the gambler's perspectives.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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October 3, 2019

Title: Cybersecurity Challenges and Solutions
Speaker:Emily Massah
Consultant
Crisis and Security Consulting
Control Risks
Washington, D.C.
Abstract: Have you ever wondered what "hacking" really means? What is "GDPR"? Why shouldn't one use the same password for everything? This talk will focus on foundational cybersecurity knowledge and current challenges in the industry. Several recent case studies will be discussed.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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October 10, 2019

Title: Finding the Best Way From Here to There: A Primer on Variational Calculus
Speaker:Darren Mason
Professor
Mathematics & Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI
Abstract: Given a task to accomplish, it is natural to ask what is the best way to achieve your goal? Maybe you are flying from Beijing to London and need the shortest flight path. Or you are selling fuel and you want to find the optimal time $t$ to sell it so that you can maximize your profit. Or you are crossing a river with a strong current and want to determine a propeller direction (as a function of time) so that you cross the river in the least amount of time. The number of possible questions of this type seems endless. During this lecture we will discuss some of the above problems, a famous brain-teaser called the brachistochrone problem, and illustrate how to find solutions to these problems using a version of calculus that makes sense in infinite dimensions — the interesting field of variational calculus!
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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October 24, 2019

Title: Finding Big O with My CompSci Degree
Speaker:Matthew Seely
E-Learning Services Assistant
Education
AAP
Itasca, IL
Abstract: Why do you want to be a computer scientist? What are some of the avenues for employment after graduation? Hear a recent graduate's tale of looking for a meaningful career with some misadventures along the way.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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October 31, 2019

Title: See Yourself as a Consulting Actuary
Speaker:Judith A. Kermans, EA, FCA, MAAA
President & Senior Consultant

Kurt Dosson '09, ASA, MAAA
Consultant

Kenneth G. Alberts '87

Gabriel, Roeder, Smith & Company (GRS)
Southfield, Michigan
Abstract: President Kermans and her team will be discussing the actuarial science profession as well as the role of GRS within the actuarial science and benefits consulting profession.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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November 7, 2019

Title: Abstractions and Single Responsibility: Breaking Apart Problems
Speaker:Culver Ganem-Redd '11
Software Engineer II
Camtasia team
TechSmith Corporation
Okemos, Michigan
Abstract: The ability to break apart a problem into smaller pieces is a key skill to learn when writing code, as well as in many other fields. In software engineering, we often think of this process in terms of "layers of abstraction" and "responsibilities". In this talk, I will explain why thinking in abstractions can be so important, introduce the Single Responsibility Principle, show some examples of how we tend to approach abstractions at TechSmith, and offer suggestions on how to apply this kind of thinking in other fields.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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November 14, 2019

Title: A Difference Equation Approach to Finite Differences of Polynomials
Speaker:Michael A. Jones
Managing Editor, AMS|Mathematical Reviews and Editor, MAA Mathematics Magazine
Ann Arbor, MI
Abstract: First, I will explain why the $\left(n+1\right)$st difference sequence is zero for sequence data generated by an $n$th degree polynomial. Then, I will use difference equations to show that if a sequence has its $(n+1)\text{st}$ difference sequence equal to zero, and $n+0$ is the smallest such integer, then a polynomial of degree $n$ can generate the sequential data. The difference equation approach is new. But, more can be said about the polynomial; I will review others' results on how to construct the polynomial.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM
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November 21, 2019

Title: My favorite theorem in fiction: the first incompleteness theorem.
Speaker:Andrew-David Bjork
Associate Professor
Mathematics
Siena Heights University
Adrian, Michigan
Abstract: Many authors have incorporated mathematics into their writings. Few have done so as intentionally as Neal Stephenson. His novel Cryptonomicon, published in 1999, holds one of my favorite narrations of Gödel's celebrated result. This talk will follow and explain Stephenson's treatment of the first incompleteness theorem. I will also invite a conversation on the liberal arts today, and why we care so deeply about more than mathematics.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 pm
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