Calendar of Events

2023-2024 Academic Year Calendar of Events

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(Faculty/Staff Only)

9/14/23 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Symmetry Groups: The mathematical connection between patterns in Moorish architecture and the artwork of M.C. Escher
9/21/23 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Planning for Graduate Study in Mathematics and Computer Science
9/28/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Edward Frenkel
The Langlands Program (Video)
10/5/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Lara K. Pudwell
Patterns in Permutations
10/12/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Michael A. Jones
The Will Rogers Phenomenon and Sequential Migration
10/26/23 Math/CS Colloquium:
Between the Folds, a film by Vanessa Gould
11/2/23 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Principles of X-ray Computed Tomography
11/9/23 Math/CS Colloquium: NOVA Video
Inside China's Tech Boom
11/16/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Mark Bollman
Changing The Deck Changes The Game: Poker Without 52 Cards
11/28/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Caroline Hurteau and Elmer Lee
INNOVATE Albion
2/1/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Ramon Olavarria
Opportunities in Semi
2/8/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Erik Davis
Function Field Arithmetic: Working with Analogues
2/15/23 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Careers in Mathematics and Computer Science
2/22/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Stanley Ryan Huddy
The Top-Bottom Shuffle and Two Related Card Tricks
2/29/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Paul Anderson
Estimating Population Size using Capture-Recapture Data
3/14/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Mark Bollman
Pizza and Pamphlets plus Pi Day Extravaganza
3/21/23 Math/CS Colloquium: Angela Morrison
Fake It Till You Make It: Circuits of Pseudoflow Polyhedra

September 14, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Symmetry Groups: The mathematical connection between patterns in Moorish architecture and the artwork of M.C. Escher
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: The mathematical structure of symmetrical patterns can be studied using group theory. The Moors built many magnificent buildings richly decorated with geometric patterns during their rule of the Iberian peninsula (711-1492). The graphic artist M.C. Escher visited southern Spain in 1922 and was captivated by the patterns that richly decorate the architecture of the Alhambra, Alcazar, and other Moorish buildings. After a second visit to Spain in 1935, Escher became obsessed with creating patterns of interlocking figures based on these elaborate tiling patterns. While Escher had no formal mathematical training, he used mathematical methods grounded in scientific literature to study these patterns. We will view these patterns through the lens of group theory, one of the great mathematical accomplishments of the 19th century. This talk will be highly visual with many pictures of Escher's works and Moorish architecture.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

September 21, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Planning for Graduate Study in Mathematics and Computer Science
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for graduate school in areas such as mathematics, statistics, computer science, engineering, finance, and law. Come learn about graduate school and options you will have to further your education after graduation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30

September 28, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: The Langlands Program (Video)
Speaker:Edward Frenkel
Professor of Mathematics
Mathematics
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley, California, USA
Abstract: Professor Edward Frenkel discusses the famed Langland Program — "a kind of grand unified theory of mathematics".

This video is part of the Numberphile series, a collection of freely available videos by Brady Haran about numbers and mathematics. See youtube.com/@numberphile for this and other videos.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

October 5, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Patterns in Permutations
Speaker:Lara K. Pudwell
Professor
Mathematics and Statistics
Valparaiso University
Valparaiso, Indiana, USA
Abstract: This engaging article takes the reader on a journey in which a graphical representation of permutations provokes an interesting counting problem with surprising results. The article begins with a clear definition and visualiza- tion of permutations. A well-chosen permutation of the digits 1-9 illustrates patterns within permutations, prompting the question of how many permu- tations avoid a given pattern. The article continues with progressively more complicated examples which prepare the reader for two surprising examples and an unsolved problem.

There are unexpected connections made to famous landmarks as the journey unfolds. A computer science problem from Donald Knuth motivates the counting question. A nicely illustrated explanation of a recursive solution of one counting problem leads directly to the Catalan numbers. A related problem is solved with a familiar recurrence relation, the generator of the Fibonacci numbers. The article concludes with some intriguing clues to send the reader on a journey into more complicated and unsolved problems.

This video was recorded at the 2023 MAA MAthFest conference where the speaker recived the Trevor Evans Award, established by the Board of Governors in 1992 and first awarded in 1996. It is made to authors of expository articles accessible to undergraduates and published in Math Horizons. The Award is named for Trevor Evans, a distinguished mathematician, teacher, and writer at Emory University.

video       slides
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

October 12, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: The Will Rogers Phenomenon and Sequential Migration
Speaker:Michael A. Jones
Managing and Associate Editor
Mathematical Reviews
American Mathematical Society
Ann Arbor, MI
Abstract: The Will Rogers phenomenon describes when elements are moved or migrate from one set to another and the averages in both sets increase. We provide a mathematical condition for when the phenomenon occurs and when sequential migration results in the phenomenon occurring at each step of migration. We use an example to explore other questions including the likelihood of the phenomenon occurring and its relationship to Simpson's paradox. This work is joint with Allison Mocny (undergraduate student at Case Western University) and Jennifer Wilson (New School University).
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

October 26, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Between the Folds, a film by Vanessa Gould
Speaker:
Abstract: Green Fuse Films' award-winning documentary Between the Folds chronicles the stories of ten fine artists and intrepid theoretical scientists who have abandoned careers and scoffed at hard-earned graduate degrees—all to forge unconventional lives as modern-day paperfolders.

As they converge on the unlikely medium of origami, these artists and scientists reinterpret the world in paper, and bring forth a bold mix of sensibilities towards art, expressiveness, creativity and meaning. And, together these offbeat and provocative minds demonstrate the innumerable ways that art and science come to bear as we struggle to understand and honor the world around us—as artists, scientists, creators, collaborators, preservers, and simply curious beings.

"Luminously photographed", with a "haunting" original score featuring the Budapest Symphony Orchestra, the film paints an arresting portrait of the mysterious creative threads that bind us all–fusing science and sculpture, form and function, ancient and new.

See www.greenfusefilms.com for more information.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:10 pm

November 2, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Principles of X-ray Computed Tomography
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: The roots of x-ray computed tomography (CT) date back to several key developments roughly 100 years old. When introduced in 1972, x-ray CT revolutionized medicine and it was recognized in 1979 by the awarding of the Nobel Prize to the scientists credited for its invention. X-ray CT is a technique for gaining knowledge of the internal structure and composition of an object using physical measurements, mathematical analysis, and computational methods. X-ray CT is used today for many medical diagnostic tests. It is also used in manufacturing and engineering for non-destructive testing of objects. This talk will cover the history of the physics, mathematics, and computer science of x-ray CT, discuss the design of modern scanners, and give example applications of x-ray CT in both medicine and manufacturing.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

November 9, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Inside China's Tech Boom
Speaker:NOVA Video

Abstract: In the span of just a few decades, China has transformed into a science and technology superpower. But how did it get here and where is it headed? Take an insider's tour of high-profile tech companies and labs that are driving China's meteoric rise to the forefront of global innovation. How does China innovate? What drives its bid for technological supremacy? And what does its rise mean for the future of the global economy?
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

November 16, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Changing The Deck Changes The Game: Poker Without 52 Cards
Speaker:Mark Bollman
Professor of Mathematics and Chair, department of Mathematics & Computer Science
Mathematics & Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI
Abstract: We will examine how changing the composition of a deck of playing cards from the standard 52-card deck changes some 5-card hand frequencies. Some examples will be drawn from decks that have been proposed and marketed; others will involve hypothetical decks that may offer new interesting possibilities in game design.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

November 28, 2023

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: INNOVATE Albion
Speaker:Caroline Hurteau and Elmer Lee
INNOVATE Albion
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: INNOVATE Albion is a teaching and training center for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), and robotics in Southwest Michigan. As a nonprofit organization, founded in collaboration with Caster Concepts, Inc. and Conceptual Innovations, we bring to students, educators, and professionals to build the next generation of skilled talent in our region.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

February 1, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Opportunities in Semi
Speaker:Ramon Olavarria
Sr. IT Director
IT
KLA
Milpitas, CA
Abstract: KLA is a leader in Optical and Electron Beam Inspection. Our customers, Samsung, Intel, Micron, Global Foundry, just to name a few partner with KLA to help drive the next generation of microchips We're at the nexus of electron and photon optics, sensor technology and artificial intelligence. From raw wafer to next-gen chip to world-altering idea, we help enable what's next. KLA is proud to be part of the most significant technological breakthroughs. Virtually no laptop, smartphone, wearable device, voice-controlled gadget, flexible screen, VR device or smart car would have made it into your hands without us. I will discuss what KLA does and how Mathmatics and Computer Science graduates come and make a difference at KLA.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

February 8, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Function Field Arithmetic: Working with Analogues
Speaker:Erik Davis
Mathematics
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX
Abstract: In studying arithmetic of various kinds, one is often faced with fairly abstract settings. In order to grapple with these settings, it is often useful to first understand a similar story that already has some development and then return to the new setting with an analogy in mind. In this talk, I will provide some examples of this from the setting of function fields.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

February 15, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title:Careers in Mathematics and Computer Science
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI, USA
Abstract:A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for employment in areas such as teaching, actuarial science, software development, engineering, and finance. Come learn about career opportunities awaiting you after graduation.
Location:Palenske 227
Time:3:30 PM

February 22, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: The Top-Bottom Shuffle and Two Related Card Tricks
Speaker:Stanley Ryan Huddy
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Gildart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Teaneck, New Jersey
Abstract: Card tricks are often a combination of mathematics and sleight of hand. For those with a lack of dexterity, I'll explain two self-working tricks that are purely mathematical. Both tricks rely on the Top-Bottom Shuffle. I will develop the mathematics behind the shuffle and prove why each trick works.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

February 29, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Estimating Population Size using Capture-Recapture Data
Speaker:Paul Anderson
Dr. Paul Anderson
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: Capture-recapture is a sampling design that is used to estimate the size of animal populations in a wilderness. A random sample of $M$ animals is captured, and the animals are tagged and released. At a later time, another random sample of $n$ animals will be recaptured and the number of tagged animals $X$ is recorded.

Given values of $M$, $n$, and $X$, we will estimate the population size $N$ using the hypergeometric probability distribution. We will then be able to approximate the hypergeometric distribution with the normal distribution. From the normal distribution, we derive a third-degree polynomial that provides a confidence interval for the unknown $N$.

To illustrate our method, we will break into groups. Each group will estimate the number of black beans in a bowl. The estimate will be in the form of a confidence interval.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

March 14, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Pizza and Pamphlets plus Pi Day Extravaganza
Speaker:Mark Bollman
Professor of Mathematics and Chair
Mathematics & Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: Pizza and Pamphlets is the event where the Mathematics and Computer Science Department provides information about spring courses in Mathematics and Computer Science. All Math majors/minors, Computer Science majors/minors, Math/Physics majors, Math/Econ majors, prospective majors, and friends of the department are invited to join us. The event will be held at 3:30 pm in Palenske 227/229. Bring your friends; bring your questions; bring your schedule. We will also provide pizza and pop!

We will also celebrate Pi Day with a selection of pie!
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

March 21, 2024

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Fake It Till You Make It: Circuits of Pseudoflow Polyhedra
Speaker:Angela Morrison
Mrs.
Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
University of Colorado Denver
Denver, Colorado
Abstract: There is a wealth of combinatorial algorithms for classical min-cost flow problems and their simpler variants like max flow or shortest-path problems. It is well-known that several of these algorithms are intimately related to the Simplex method and the more general circuit augmentation schemes. Prime examples are the network Simplex method, a refinement of the primal Simplex method, and (min-mean) cycle canceling, which corresponds to a (steepest-descent) circuit augmentation scheme over the underlying polyhedron. We are interested in deepening and expanding the understanding of the close relationship between circuit augmentation and combinatorial network flows algorithms. To this end, we generalize from the consideration of primal or dual feasible flows to the so-called pseudoflows, which allow for a violation of flow balance. We introduce what are called 'pseudoflow polyhedra', in which slack variables are used to quantify this violation, and characterize their circuits. This enables us to study various network flows algorithms in view of the walks that they trace in these polyhedra, and in view of the pivot rules used to choose the steps.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

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