Calendar of Events

2018-2019 Academic Year Calendar of Events

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(Faculty/Staff Only)

9/13/18 Math/CS Colloquium: Mark Bollman
Casino Carnival Games: Past, Present, and Future
9/20/18 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Planning for Graduate Study in Mathematics and Computer Science
9/27/18 Math/CS Colloquium: Michael Ivanitskiy1 and Michael A. Jones2
Reducibility and Balanced Intransitive Dice
10/4/18 Math/CS Colloquium: Angela Morrison, '17
Multi-Lens Analysis of Office Dynamics and Space Usage
10/11/18 Math/CS Colloquium: David A. Reimann
Spherical Panoramic Photographic Polyhedra
11/15/18 Math/CS Colloquium: Matt Boelkins
The Geometry of Polynomials

September 13, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Casino Carnival Games: Past, Present, and Future
Speaker:Mark Bollman
Professor of Mathematics
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, MI
Abstract: Beyond the "big four" casino table games of baccarat, blackjack, craps, and roulette, over 1000 different games have been designed, proposed for casino use, and approved by the state of Nevada. In this presentation, we shall look at the math behind some of the games that have fallen by the wayside and at the mathematical issues that arise in designing a new game of chance. An opportunity to investigate the mathematics behind a new game proposal will be announced.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

September 20, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Planning for Graduate Study in Mathematics and Computer Science
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: A degree in mathematics or computer science is excellent preparation for graduate school in areas such as mathematics, statistics, computer science, engineering, finance, and law. Come learn about graduate school and options you will have to further your education after graduation.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30

September 27, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Reducibility and Balanced Intransitive Dice
Speaker:Michael Ivanitskiy1 and Michael A. Jones2
1University of Michigan; 2Mathematical Reviews
Ann Arbor, MI
Abstract: We will review some results about balanced intransitive $n$-sided dice and what it means for a set of dice to be reducible based on a concatenation operation. Using data from the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, the lexicographical ordering of dice, and permutations, we are able to construct new integer sequences representing the number of $n$-sided reducible and irreducible dice. We define a notion of margin and explain how margins are effected by concatenation. We introduce a new splicing operation that generalizes concatenation and give conditions for when the resulting dice are balanced and irreducible. Finally, we construct new integer sequences for the number of fair, balanced dice and the largest margins for $n$-sided, balanced intransitive dice.

Bonus: You will either get to make or will be given a set of balanced, intransitive dice.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

October 4, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Multi-Lens Analysis of Office Dynamics and Space Usage
Speaker:Angela Morrison, '17
Graduate Student
Mathematics
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan
Abstract: Workplace optimization is critical for organizations to make the most of their real estate as well as help employees stay more productive at work. Steelcase Space Analytics equips organizations with tools and data needed to measure and improve the effectiveness of the workplace by applying their proprietary sensing capability. This project aims to analyze office space dynamics and usage by investigating correlations between and within sensing and survey datasets sourced from Steelcase's 2 West (2W) facility. The data consists of sensor output that describes how often spaces are in use, as well as survey data that reports how the 2W employees feel about using certain spaces. Clustering analysis was developed to study the hidden trends of the sensor data and generalized linear mixed model (GLLM) was constructed to investigate the correlations between the sensor data and space traits data. The results showed that the significant space traits indicated by the GLMM were also the popular ones from survey data analysis.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

October 11, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: Spherical Panoramic Photographic Polyhedra
Speaker:David A. Reimann
Professor
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan
Abstract: Conventional cameras view a small solid angle, limiting the both the field of view and projective distortion. However, multiple individual pictures are need to have full spherical coverage. Cameras that can directly take spherical panoramic photos, such as the Ricoh Theta~S, have become available as relatively inexpensive consumer products. Unlike a traditional camera, this camera has two hemispherical lenses, allowing it to see simultaneously in every direction around the camera. These cameras produce an equirectangular projection, where each latitude row has the same number of pixels, which has severe distortion at the poles. One approach to hardcopy display is to map the image onto the surface of a small polyhedron, such as a Platonic or Archimedean solid, which reduces the distortion. Using such polyhedra resembles the process artist Dick Termes uses for painting on a sphere, which he calls a Termesphere. These techniques force the viewer to see the world inside-out. This work maps the spherical photo to the inside of a large polyhedra to create a miniature pavilion which can be entered for a personal panoramic experience. Other interesting applications and issues will be discussed.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

November 15, 2018

Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium
Title: The Geometry of Polynomials
Speaker:Matt Boelkins
Professor of Mathematics, Grand Valley State University
Mathematics
Grand Valley State University
Allendale, MI
Abstract: In the geometry of polynomials, we seek to understand relationships among certain sets connected to polynomial functions. For example, Marden's Theorem reveals stunning connections between the critical numbers of a cubic polynomial with complex zeros and the inscribed in-ellipse of the triangle whose vertices are the polynomial's zeros.
triangle
In this talk, we'll discuss several important historical results from the geometry of polynomials and survey developments in the past 25 years that are centered on polynomial root-dragging, the study of how continuously changing one or more roots of a polynomial function affects various properties of the function. We will encounter some surprising structural results about polynomial functions that deserve to be more well-known and also see beautiful interplay between calculus and Euclidean geometry.
Location: Palenske 227
Time: 3:30 PM

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