Albion College Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium

Title:Student Presentations
Mathematics and Computer Science
Albion College
Albion, Michigan, USA
Abstract: Yang Chen, "Validity of Unbiased forward rate hypothesis"
A market is efficient if the market price reflects all publicly available information. In line with the unbiased forward rate hypothesis (UFH), the Foreign Exchange (FOREX) markets are efficient in the sense that arbitrage keeps exchange rates between any two currencies to be consistent with other exchange rates. This paper examines the validity of the UFH, argues that the forward exchange rates are not unbiased predictors of future spot rates, and concludes FOREX markets are not efficient due to information lags.

Matt Howe, "User login and authentication and security through the web"
A discussion of these login and authentication as implemented on Squeller.

Rachel Kamischke, "Teaching les Mathématiques en France and in the United States"
A discussion of research comapring the mathematics education systems in France and the USA.

Mike Smar, "Can Machines Think: A Brief History"
In 1950 Alan Turing proposed what we now call The Turing Test as a measure of whether a machine could think. This was understandably controversial. Since then, various AI's have been put forth, such as ELIZA and PERRY, and various contentions have been raised, some by Turing himself. So, given a sufficiently advanced AI, is it thinking in the same sense that people think, or is it just blindly manipulating symbols?

Robbie Sessions, "Development of a Networked Poker Client"
If you've ever been to a casino, you know the thrill of gambling. With the rise of the internet, you can still get in on the action without even leaving your house. Online poker is a booming example. However, the development of a poker client capable of supporting networked play is no easy feat. This talk will explore the challenges to overcome in creating one's own networked poker client, including establishing client/server communication, handling dynamic game logic, supporting scalability, and idiot-proofing a graphical user interface. This project is only in its infancy, but it has already shown great promise.

Location:Palenske 227
Time:3:10 PM

author  = "{Students}",
title   = "{Student Presentations}",
address = "{Albion College Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium}",
month   = "{29 April}",
year    = "{2010}"